VGC

The entirety of Twitch has reportedly been leaked

Source codes and user payouts among the data released in a 128GB torrent

An anonymous hacker claims to have leaked the entirety of Twitch, including its source code and user payout information.

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The user posted a 125GB torrent link to 4chan on Wednesday, stating that the leak was intended to “foster more disruption and competition in the online video streaming space” because “their community is a disgusting toxic cesspool”.

VGC can verify that the files mentioned on 4chan are publicly available to download as described by the anonymous hacker.

One anonymous company source told VGC that the leaked data is legitimate, including the source code for the Amazon-owned streaming platform.

Internally, Twitch is aware of the breach, the source said, and it’s believed that the data was obtained as recently as Monday. We’ve requested comment from Twitch and will update this story when it replies.

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[UPDATE: Twitch has confirmed the leak is authentic: “We can confirm a breach has taken place. Our teams are working with urgency to understand the extent of this. We will update the community as soon as additional information is available. Thank you for bearing with us.”]

The leaked Twitch data reportedly includes:

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Some Twitter users have started making their way through the 125GB of information that has leaked, with one claiming that the torrent also includes encrypted passwords, and recommending that users enable two-factor authentication to be safe.

If you have a Twitch account, it’s recommended that you also turn on two-factor authentication, which ensures that even if your password is compromised, you still need your phone to prove your identity using either SMS or an authenticator app.

To turn on two-factor identification:

[UPDATE: Twitch has said there’s “no indication” that login details were exposed in Wednesday’s data leak, and that credit card information wasn’t taken.]

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The torrent also reportedly includes Unity code for a game called Vapeworld, which appears to be chat software based on Amazon’s unreleased Steam competitor Vapor.

Meanwhile, Vapor, the codename for an alleged in-development Steam competitor, is claimed to integrate many of Twitch’s features into a bespoke game store.

Finally, the leaked documents allegedly show that popular streamers such as Shroud, Nickmercs and DrLupo have earned millions from working with the popular streaming platform.

What it doesn’t include is money that streamers have earned outside of Twitch, including merchandise, YouTube revenue, sponsorships and external donations.

Despite this caveat, the list shows that 81 Twitch streamers have been paid more than $1 million by Twitch since August 2019.

The anonymous leaker has stated that this is just the first part of the content due to be leaked, but hasn’t stated what they plan to also release.

One cyber security expert said on Wednesday that, if fully confirmed, the Twitch hack “will be the biggest leak I have ever seen”.

Twitch has regularly found itself under fire from creators and users who feel the site doesn’t take enough action against problematic members of the Twitch community.

Last month a group of Twitch streamers called on other channels and viewers to boycott the site for 24 hours as a response to hate raids.

VGC has not downloaded the entire torrent but can confirm it does contain 125GB of data

On the same day as the campaign was initially announced, Twitch posted a thread on Twitter explaining that it was attempting to stop hate raids but that it was not “a simple fix”.

“No one should have to experience malicious and hateful attacks based on who they are or what they stand for,” it stated. “This is not the community we want on Twitch, and we want you to know we are working hard to make Twitch a safer place for creators.

“Hate spam attacks are the result of highly motivated bad actors, and do not have a simple fix. Your reports have helped us take action – we’ve been continually updating our sitewide banned word filters to help prevent variations on hateful slurs, and removing bots when identified.

“We’ve been building channel-level ban evasion detection and account improvements to combat this malicious behaviour for months. However, as we work on solutions, bad actors work in parallel to find ways around them – which is why we can’t always share details.”